Monday, September 15, 2014

How to Prepare for Deep Tissue Massage

Since my previous post, I received a few questions from some clients who are new to “deep tissue” massage techniques. So, I thought perhaps writing a follow-up on how to prepare for, and what to expect from, your first deep tissue massage treatment.

First, it’s always a good thing to be well hydrated, and have eaten a small meal (just a little something), to arrive warm from a workout or from stretching. All this can help ensure you get the most out of your deep tissue treatment.

Always let your therapist know all the issues and symptoms you may be facing right up front and before you begin — after all, stiffness and chronic pain can sometimes result from other injuries, poor posture, etc. The more your massage therapist knows, the more he/she can assist you during the session.

Do your best to arrive a bit early for your first appointment. A good and professional therapist will have forms for you to fill out and questions to ask you before beginning your treatment.

The Experience

I usually ask my clients to make themselves comfortable on my massage table and encourage them to breathe deeply, relax and prepare for the massage. My deep tissue treatments tend to consist of longer, deeper, and more intense strokes. Sometimes I may use my elbows, forearms, fingertips and specialized tools to access the deeper layers of muscle where the initial problem may reside.

Because I am massaging the innermost layers of my client’s connective tissues and muscles, there are times when my client may experience a slight increase in pain or discomfort. This is why it is imperative that you take an active role in the session by not dozing off and by continually offering feed-back regarding the levels of pain you may be experiencing. Just note that some level of discomfort is normal as the deeper knots, adhesions and injuries are being addressed.

Although my treatments generally last about 90-minutes for deep tissue therapy, if you massage frequently, the time required will usually shrink to about an hour. This is because the body gradually releases its knots and becomes more quickly receptive to my touch.

What About After a Deep Tissue Massage?

I always council my clients that after receiving a deep tissue massage, they may experience some muscular soreness or stiffness 24 to 48 hours after their session. Typically this doesn’t last more than a day.

Immediately following my client’s session, I offer bottled water and request that they drink plenty of water and to avoid strenuous exercise the day after our massage session in order to help the muscles heal.

If the session was particularly aggressive, or if the pain remains acute, I typically recommend the client ice the areas in question, or that they try a 20-minute, hot bath soak with Epsom salts — depending on the situation.

As for YOUR particular experience and depending on the severity of the issue you’re trying to address, you may find that you feel a whole lot better after just one visit.

Still, if you are attempting to resolve a chronic condition, injury, or a condition such as extreme muscular adhesions, you may have to have a few treatments in succession before you begin to feel well again. So at the end of your session, make sure you ask for your therapist’s recommendations on the need and frequency of any related follow-up visits.

I hope this helped! :-)

Listen to Your Body,

John Aaron Villarreal

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